The pregnant male as myth and metaphor in classical Greek literature

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Cambridge University Press , New York
Masculinity in literature, Philosophy in literature, Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.), History and criticism, Greek literature, LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Ancient, Classical & Medieval, Metaphor in literature, Hi
StatementDavid D. Leitao
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA3009 .L45 2012
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25054631M
ISBN 139781107017283
LC Control Number2011039684

This book traces the image of the pregnant male in Greek literature as it evolves over the course of the classical period. The image - as deployed in myth and in metaphor - originates as a representation of paternity and, by extension, "authorship" Cited by: The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature This book traces the image of the pregnant male in Greek literature as it evolves over the course of the classical period.

The image – as deployed in myth and in metaphor – originates as a representation of paternity and, by. The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature David Leitao, The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature. This book traces the image of the pregnant male in Greek literature as it evolves over the course of the classical period.

The image - as deployed in myth and in metaphor - originates as a. Buy The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature by David D. Leitao from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Pages: The pregnant male as myth and metaphor in classical Greek literature / David D.

Leitao. Includes bibliographical references and index. isbn (hardback) 1. Greek literature – History and criticism. Philosophy in literature. Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.) – History – To 4. Masculinity in literature. This book traces the image of the pregnant male in Greek literature as it evolved over the course of the classical period.

The image – as deployed in myth and in metaphor – originated as a. The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature By Stella Sandford Topics: philosophyAuthor: Stella Sandford.

"This book traces the image of the pregnant male in Greek literature as it evolves over the course of the classical period. The image as deployed in myth and in metaphor originates as a representation of paternity and, by extension, authorship of ideas, works of art, legislation, and the like.

The pregnant male as myth and metaphor in classical Greek literature. [David D Leitao] -- "This book traces the image of the pregnant male in Greek literature as it evolves over the course of the classical. des Bouvrie: Leitao, The Pregnant Maie as Myth and Metaphor pasts, Leitao is «interested in how this image functioned as a way for the Greeks to figure paternity, legitimacy of birth, authorship, intellectual filiation.

MALE PREGNANCY - D.D. Leitao The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature. xii + New York: Cambridge University Press, Cased, £62, US$ ISBN: Stella Sandford; Published online by Cambridge University Press: 13 Novemberpp.

Details The pregnant male as myth and metaphor in classical Greek literature PDF

; Article. The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature, Cambridge Univ Pr (). ISBN ; Nussbaum, Martha C. The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press (). ISBN ; Current texts, translations, commentaries. Inhe published a book with Cambridge University Press entitled The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature.

Prof. Leitao will be on sabbatical Spring Faculty website. The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, ). Nuno Simões Rodrigues [Review] DUBEL, S. (ed.): Lucien de Samosate. He has published numerous articles on Greek adolescence and on the history of gender and sexuality in ancient Greece.

Inhe published a book with Cambridge University Press entitled The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature. Travails of the Father: Male Pregnancy as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature (forthcoming New York: Cambridge University Press) Publications in Refereed Journals and Collections "Male Improvisation in the Cult of Eileithyia on Paros," in M.

Parca and A. Tzanetou, eds., Finding Persephone: Women's Rituals in the Ancient. Myth is a folklore genre consisting of narratives or stories that play a fundamental role in a society, such as foundational tales or origin main characters in myths are usually gods, demigods or supernatural humans.

Stories of everyday human beings, although often of leaders of some type, are usually contained in legends, as opposed to myths. numerous ancient Greek authors. In particular, the works of Athenian playwrights and the legal arguments of orators have proven to be the most useful.

Of course, any use of ancient sources written in an ancient language requires close examination. A large number of Greek words, carrying connotations which our translation does not convey. Diogenes of Athens (Greek: Διογένης ὁ Ἀθηναῖος) was a writer of Greek tragedy in the late 5th or early 4th century BC.

His works are listed by the Suda as Semele, Achilles, Helen, Herakles, Thyestes, Medea, Oedipus, and Chrysippus. Homeric Metaphors Homer was the first, and arguably the greatest, user of similes and metaphors to aid in the creation of vivid imagery in the minds of the audience. Ancient Greek culture, as reflected by Homer, placed great value in the achievement of glory through great physical feats such as slaying an arch-enemy in war or being the greatest.

Scribes and Scholars: A Guide to the Transmission of Greek and Latin Literature. +Review by Michele Valerie Ronnick The Pregnant Male as Myth and Metaphor in Classical Greek Literature. 4 thoughts on “Top 12 Popular and Fascinating Ancient Greece Myths” This is a very concise, accessible but thorough review of those Greek myths that so often appear as metaphors and allusions in European art, music and Literature.

It is fine review and an. As one might expect, childbirth in the ancient world was extremely dangerous.

This was due partially to a lack of understanding about the female body, leading to societal assumptions about pregnancy and childbirth, as well as the use of potentially dangerous herbs.

Description The pregnant male as myth and metaphor in classical Greek literature PDF

The Hippocratic writings A large portion of the written sources about women’s. Anything can get you pregnant. But seriously, anything could get you pregnant in the old myths, and not even men were safe. There are of course even more stories of men turning into females (human or animal) and getting pregnant that way, but to keep it simple I only added those who got pregnant in male.

Bibliography of Classical Folklore Scholarship: Myths, Legends, and Popular Beliefs of Ancient Greece and Rome Adrienne Mayor Folklore (London) (April ): Introduction Ancient Greek and Roman literature contains rich troves of folklore and popular beliefs, many of which have counterparts in modern contemporary legends.

Female homosexuality in Greek and Roman society and mythology is as important a theme as male homosexuality but it is not nearly as visible. Sappho, a lyric poetess from the island of Lesbos (sixth century B.C.), perhaps offers the most overt evidence.

SOME CONCLUSIONS AND A DEFINITION OF CLASSICAL MYTH.

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Myrrha (Greek: Μύρρα, Mýrra), also known as Smyrna (Greek: Σμύρνα, Smýrna), is the mother of Adonis in Greek was transformed into a myrrh tree after having had intercourse with her father and given birth to Adonis as a tree.

Although the tale of Adonis has Semitic roots, it is uncertain from where the myth of Myrrha emerged, though it was likely from Cyprus. Ancient Greek society placed considerable emphasis on literature and, according to many, the whole Western literary tradition began there, with the epic poems of Homer.

In addition to the invention of the epic and lyric forms of poetry, though, the Greeks were also essentially responsible for the invention of drama, and they produced masterpieces of both tragedy and comedy that are still Ratings: 8 Pregnant By Water And Sunbeam Navajo Mythology.

Navajo mythology has two important female figures: the Changing Woman, who represents the Earth and the seasons, and her sister, White Shell Woman. Apparently, they were too important to be satisfied with regular men. One day, the sisters were out walking and suddenly felt in need of male. The subject of women in antiquity is a fascinating, but admittedly difficult pursuit.

Women’s voices in ancient times were largely ignored or silenced in literature, historical narratives, philosophical discourse, and political life.

Since pursuits in the philosophical realm were predominantly viewed as the domain of elite men, women, slaves, and other minorities are often left.Ancient Origins articles related to pregnancy in the sections of history, archaeology, human origins, unexplained, artifacts, ancient places and myths and legends.

(Page of tag pregnancy).Myths are sacred stories. They tell of the origin of the wold and humankind, the existence and activities of gods and spirits, the creation of order in the universe. Myths relate to the origins of human traditions and articulate a society's values and norms. They tell how to behave and distinguish good from evil.